Native American Storytelling: A Reader of Myths and Legends by Karl Kroeber

By Karl Kroeber

The myths and legends during this booklet were chosen either for his or her excellence as tales and since they illustrate the precise nature of local American storytelling.

  • A selection of local American myths and legends.
  • Selected for his or her excellence as tales, and since they illustrate the special nature of local American storytelling.
  • Drawn from the oral traditions of all significant parts of aboriginal North the United States.
  • Reveals the hugely functional capabilities of myths and legends in local American societies.
  • Illustrates American Indians’ profound engagement with their ordinary atmosphere.
  • Edited through a superb interpreter of local American oral tales.

Content:
Chapter 1 From Elsie Clews Parsons, Tewa stories. Washington, DC: Memoirs of the yank Folklore Society, 19 (1926), 191–2. (pages 16–17):
Chapter 2 From Evon Vogt, the Kalispell Language: an overview of the Grammar with Texts, Translations, and Dictionary. Oslo: Det Norske Videnskaps?Akademi (1920), 28. (pages 19–20):
Chapter three From Franz Boas, Kathlamet Texts. Washington, DC: Bulletin of the Bureau of yank Ethnology 26 (1901), 26–32. (pages 22–24):
Chapter four From Nehalem Tillamook stories, instructed via Clara Pearson, Recorded through Elizabeth Derr Jacobs, Ed. Melville Jacobs. Corvallis: Oregon nation collage Press (1990), 45–58. (pages 27–38):
Chapter five From Clark Wissler, “Some Dakota Myths II,” magazine of yank Folklore 20 (1907), 195–206, 197–9. (pages 41–44):
Chapter 6 From James Mooney, Myths of the Cherokees. Washington, DC: Annual record of the Bureau of yank Ethnology 19 (1897–8) 3–575, 240. (pages 47–48):
Chapter 7 From A. L. Kroeber, Ethnology of the Gros Ventre. long island: Anthropological Papers of the yankee Museum of traditional historical past 1, half four (1907), 141–281, 60–1. (pages 49–51):
Chapter eight From James Mooney, Myths of the Cherokees. Washington, DC: Annual file of the Bureau of yankee Ethnology 19 (1897–8), 3–575; “Kana'ti. and Selu,” 242–8 (pages 53–59):
Chapter nine From Jeremiah Curtin and J. N. B. Hewitt, Seneca Fiction, Legends, and Myths. Annual file of the Bureau of yankee Ethnology 32 (1910–11), 460–1. (pages 61–63):
Chapter 10 From Arthur C. Parker, Seneca Myths and people stories. Buffalo, manhattan: Buffalo ancient Society, e-book sequence 27 (1923), 290–2. (pages 65–66):
Chapter eleven From in Honor of Eyak: The artwork of Anna Nelson Harry, Ed. Michael E. Krauss. Fairbanks, AL: local Language heart, college of Alaska (1982), 120–2. Reprinted by way of Permission of the local Language heart. (pages 69–71):
Chapter 12 From James Mooney, Myths of the Cherokee. Washington, DC: Annual file of the Bureau of yankee Ethnology 19 (1897–8), 3–557, 319. (pages 73–74):
Chapter thirteen From Edward Sapir, Wishram Texts. courses of the yank Ethnological Society, Leiden: Brill (1909). (pages 78–80):
Chapter 14 From Edward Sapir, Wishram Texts. courses of the yank Ethnological Society, Leiden: Brill (1909). (pages 80–82):
Chapter 15 From Edward Sapir, Wishram Texts. courses of the yank Ethnological Society, Leiden: Brill (1909). (pages 83–85):
Chapter sixteen From Melville Jacobs, “Badger and Coyote have been Neighbors,” foreign magazine of yank Linguistics 24:2 (1958), 106–12. Reprinted by means of Permission of the college of Chicago Press. (pages 87–90):
Chapter 17 From Melville Jacobs, “Seal and Her more youthful Brother Lived There,” foreign magazine of yankee Linguistics 25:2 (1959), 340–1. Quoted with Permission of the collage of Chicago Press. (pages 93–94):
Chapter 18 From H. R. Voth, The Traditions of the Hopi. Chicago: courses of box Columbian Museum eight (1905), 16–21. (pages 97–101):
Chapter 19 From Cora Du Bois and Dorothy Demetracopoulou, Wintu Myths. Berkeley: college of California courses in American Archaeology and Ethnology, 28:5 (1921), 360–2. (pages 103–104):
Chapter 20 From Edward Sapir, Yana Texts. Berkeley: college of California guides in American Archaeology and Sthnology nine (1910), 140–2. (pages 107–108):
Chapter 21 From Washington Matthews, the Mountain Chant: A Navajo rite. Washington, DC: Annual record of the Bureau of yankee Ethnology, five (1883–4). (pages 110–117):
Chapter 22 From Walter McClintock, the previous North path. big apple: Macmillan (1910), 491–503. (pages 120–126):
Chapter 23 From Harriet Maxwell speak, Myths and Legends of the recent York nation Iroquois, Edited via Arthur C. Parker. Albany, big apple: big apple country Museum Bulletin a hundred twenty five (1908), 5–195, 23–8. (pages 128–130):

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